9.06.2007

NBARS #131: I Said I Was Raised Like One



Some days ago, a friend of mine got steamed when I referred to Melo and Arenas as "secretly Latino." Her contention? That anyone of sharp mind could've figured as much from their respective fancy names.

I pointed out that Cubans I know had no idea about Arenas until I told them, and that if anything, you'd expect this ethnic background to figure into their public profile. There are tons of Latin Americans in this country and in the world, the game is popular among them, and Najera has made more from Spanish language endorsements than he has on the court. That commercial where Melo visits PR is a prime example of this; at very least, it's probably convenient to have this as an alternative (or foil) to his upbeat Baltimore grit. Looking back at the FD archives, I was able to turn up this post, wherein I hear an Arenas radio ad that pronounces his name correctly. Which—I just checked—the bobblehead on my desk most certainly does not.

So while it's not entirely a secret that these two men have blood grown upon foreign shores, it's somewhat concealed and selective touted. For men of fame and wealth, there's no such thing as a neutral fact. No one whose very likeness is forged in the fires of public discourse has an ethnicity that's just kind of there; maybe neither one of them spends a ton of time identifying with this category, but it's a feature of their being that, for whatever reason, is immune to the gravity of celebrity. Fine, Arenas doesn't know what our shirt means. Is that a reason to completely forget that maybe, just maybe, there's a cross-cultural element to Arenas that accounts for some of his individuality? That's a harder case to make for Melo, and yet he's the one who has publicly laid claim to these roots. With star athletes, who get constituted through marketing strategies and reporter angles, it's rare for stones to gently sit there—unless someone wants it that way.



These concerns came rushing back to me when, upon Shaq's marital demise (THANKS KOBE!!!!!), papers everywhere ran a list of his spawn: Me'Arah, Shaqir, Amirah and Shareef. No shit "Shaquille" is Arabic; I'd always thought this was some sort of Afrocentric seventies thing. So what about this next generation? Times done changed; you don't wear dashikis to work, and you don't give four kids non-cooptitated Arabic names without a reason for it. So I took my horses to town, rode around the square, and unburied the following: apparently, Shaq is strongly rumored to be in the Nation of Islam, and had Farrakhan at his wedding. Page Six even mentioned it. Then, the formidable Tom Ziller turned up this L.A. Times abstract from 2002:

Turkoglu, from Turkey, and [Shaquille O'Neal] share the Muslim faith, which they learned about each other during the past All-Star game in Philadelphia.

And wouldn't you know it: this monumental exchange is also referenced in Shaq's Wikipedia entry:

The newspaper quoted him as saying, "It's a Muslim thing," with regard to the greetings he exchanged with opposing player Hedo Turkgolu before each game of that year's Western Conference Finals series. The newspaper also quoted Turkoglu as saying that he was not surprised at the gesture from O'Neal "because Muslim people support each other."

I'm not entirely sure what the moral of the story is, and I certainly see why O'Neal wouldn't be outspoken about a faith that everyone hates. Then again, I'm kind of amazed that, despite these widely available clues, you don't hear about this more. The NBA's second or third most recognizable player is very likely a Muslim, and yet it doesn't matter one way or the other. It's within the province of deduction if anyone cares, so I've got to conclude that really, the sport's audience would just rather pretend it weren't the case. If the spicy backgrounds of Anthony and Arenas are similarly kept at bay, it's also a function of fan preference. That agency is what allows for these omissions; Nike only shows us light because we have chosen to live in shade.

50 Comments:

At 9/06/2007 4:22 PM, Anonymous MODI said...

Completely unrelated post!

Free Darko, get back on top of your game! I read this post over at StopMikeLupica http://stopmikelupica.com/2007/09/darko_will_rape_your_entire_fa.php

The next time I've got to read about a Darko tirade of epic proportions that is NOT mentioned on your blog, I'm gonna write a reall nasty column at COSELLOUT. Now dust yourself off and get yourself together now!

 
At 9/06/2007 4:30 PM, Blogger Bethlehem Shoals said...

wow, that really hurts me, seeing as you've clearly never looked at this site before. otherwise, you would know that it's not about darko, and that the translation exercise happened in our comments section. and you'd know that "shoals" in the first sentence of sml's post is me, writing on another site.

 
At 9/06/2007 4:53 PM, Blogger goathair said...

I think it's absolutely a marketing thing that Shaq isn't outspoken about his religion. It all goes back to Jordan saying "Republicans buy shoes too."

Oh, and Shoals, I sent you the enlarged image.

 
At 9/06/2007 4:55 PM, Blogger moonsover said...

Loved this post. Count me as one who saw all the clues and completely overlooked the possibility that Shaq's Muslim. Like you said, it doesn't matter one way or the other, but it does add texture to an already interesting guy.

 
At 9/06/2007 5:21 PM, Blogger Bethlehem Shoals said...

for all the darko buffs:

TRANSLATION

 
At 9/06/2007 5:25 PM, Anonymous MaxwellDemon said...

Not to mine the "Muslim people support each other" comment for all the comedy therein, but I'm surprised I've never heard any specifics on the Islamic faith of any ballers. If all Muslims were simpatico, the Middle East would be a much happier place. Any word on the Shia/Sunni/other breakdown of Shaq, Hedo, Hakeem, etc?

 
At 9/06/2007 5:27 PM, Anonymous MaxwellDemon said...

PS Darfur

 
At 9/06/2007 5:27 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the NBA, religion matters not!

It's all about the color of your skin, baybay!

wv: bamwbu - Shaq's next kids' name.

 
At 9/06/2007 5:35 PM, Blogger Bethlehem Shoals said...

md--

some very cursory research I did has yielded the following: NOI operates outside of the sunni/shiite rubrice, but most black mosques are sunni. so i'm guessing that sheed and SAR would be that.

 
At 9/06/2007 6:09 PM, Anonymous TZ said...

Shareef is (a devout) Sunni. His dad is an Imam in Atlanta.

 
At 9/06/2007 6:20 PM, Blogger badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...

I've always wondered why Rex Walters never played up his Japanese ancestry. He could've been on the Japanese release of NBA Live '93.

He was Yuta Tabuse before there was Yuta Tabuse.

On a serious note, Craig Hodges claimed he was shut out of the NBA All-Star 3-point contest one year, in parts because of his Muslim faith. Though I imagine not being on an NBA team at the time had a little to do it as well.

And I'm not sure which was worse for Chris Jackson's career, becoming Mahmoud Abdul Rauf or his Tourette's.

WV: IQUEASJG = I quite envying Arenas, Stephen Jackson is my God.

 
At 9/06/2007 6:22 PM, Anonymous TZ said...

Oh, and more to the point of secret Latinos: Quincy Douby's pop is from Haiti. I just read something where he and Francisco Garcia became good friends more because of Island heritage than NYC upbringings.

 
At 9/06/2007 6:31 PM, Blogger badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...

Oh snap, Hodges did take part in the 3-point contest as a free agent.

Also, I wonder how much they'll play up Al Horford's Dominican roots.

 
At 9/06/2007 7:46 PM, Blogger Pichi Campana Aguanta said...

Horford doesn't really fit into the "secretly latino" mix because he seems to be much more connected to the latino community, as he was born in Puerto Plata. He waved the Dominican flag while celebrating the championship and speaks Spanish. I tried to corner him for an interview at the Rocky Mountain Revue but didn't succeed.

 
At 9/06/2007 9:17 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I haven't seen this commented on elsewhere, so I present it to FD:

Stones Throw records is doing the soundtrack for NBA 2K8. I always turned off the in-game music, maybe now I won't have to.

Via Pitchfork: "Stones Throw head honcho Peanut Butter Wolf has compiled B-Ball Zombie War, a twenty-track collection of Stones Throw artists and kindreds-- including Madlib, MF Doom, Talib Kweli, J Dilla, and Q-Tip-- dribbling out the syllables and the smoky beats that serves as a "companion piece" to the game. Both the game and the soundtrack album will hit shelves October 2, with a resulting tour featuring PB Wolf, Madlib, J.Rocc and others to follow in November and December."

Pretty cool eh? Not everyones cup o tea, but I was excited.

 
At 9/06/2007 9:45 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

If Rich Pryor were alive today, I'd like to think he would refer to Stephen Jackson as "double-Muslim."

 
At 9/06/2007 10:23 PM, Blogger stopmikelupica said...

Absolutely correct - NOI operates far outside the scope of "normal" Islam, but they do fall under the Sunni scope, for the most part. Great post, very intriguing ideas.

I don't think "the fans" are the reason for the "covert ethnicity" of certain players - like you said, most Boriquas don't know Carmelo is partially PR, and ditto Cubans and Arenas. It doesn't have to do with looks, either - Bernie Williams is very much a PR icon. It has to do with the athlete promoting himself as such - Anthony doesn't. He's on the Dream Team, right? Not the PR team.

The point being sometimes an athlete doesn't want to be portrayed a certain way - perhaps these two don't want to be seen as Latinos. Or maybe they just don't associate with the culture that strongly. It's not like Baltimore has a strong PR culture - maybe if Melo was raised in the Bronx he would be more comfortable with his heritage.

As for Shaq - NOI is still very controversial. Farrakhan is still despised by a lot of people, especially in the media. Perhaps Shaq is wise to downplay his connections.

And he's not the second or third most recognizable NBA player - he's still #1 among active players, just barely more so than Kobe! And no one else is close, presuming you mean recognizable among all people, not just sports fans.

Spinachdip: Craig Hodges was totally blacklisted from the NBA after appearing in Afrocentric gear and acting mad militant at the White House during the Bulls celebratory appearance with Pres. Bush. That sh*t cost him his career, in his own words. Of course, he gets props because he thinks he could still bust Reggie Miller's ass!

How come no one has come through with pictures of the Chicago outing yet?

 
At 9/06/2007 10:29 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Craig Hodges was totally blacklisted from the NBA after appearing in Afrocentric gear and acting mad militant at the White House during the Bulls celebratory appearance with Pres. Bush. That sh*t cost him his career, in his own words. Of course, he gets props because he thinks he could still bust Reggie Miller's ass!"

Best SML quote all fuckin' year. Lordy.

 
At 9/06/2007 10:34 PM, Blogger T. said...

Badly Drawn Boykins - As I understand it Sexy Rexy's father left/abandoned/something or other his mother prior to his birth - so he really has zero connection to being Japanese. I suppose its the opposite of Scott "the Asian Assassin" Fujita*

*white guy, raised as Californian-Japanese, linebacker for the Saints.

 
At 9/06/2007 10:43 PM, Blogger Aaron said...

What would happen if Jordan Farmar and a hypothetical second Jew were to exchange a secret handshake before games and explain it by saying "It's a Jew thing"?

 
At 9/06/2007 10:46 PM, Blogger badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...

sml - I was about to type, "Wasn't the Bulls' championship run during the Clinton years?", but then I realized Hodges was there for the first two years, during H.W.'s term in the White House. Damn, I'm getting old.

T. - Fujita's awesome. He's completely embraced his Japanese-ness.

As for Gil, I guess it's like Melo associating more with B'more than PR - it's one thing if he'd grown up on Calle Ocho, but his dad moved him around, so he's more L.A. than anything else.

 
At 9/06/2007 11:34 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

As per Shaq: the NOI rumors notwithstanding, there's also the possibility that he's in the Nation of Gods and Earths (the Five Percent). Practically every guest MC on his records (ah, his records . . .) was Five Percent. They self-identify as Muslims, call their religion Islam, were founded by a splinter group from the NOI, etc.

This is just speculation, not based on anything, but I just thought I'd throw that log on the fire.

 
At 9/06/2007 11:46 PM, Anonymous MODI said...

Fair enough Shoals as I associated you with Fanhouse. Although I've been around this way a couple of times, egg has been peeled off face. Even still blog-naming comes with some permanent commitments!

Good article. I think the Shaq-muslim thing is no small point. Arenas and Melo may be a preference thing, but I wonder if it would effect his endorsement if Shaq was more open about it. Also, given our political climate and his outgoing personality, Shaq coming out of the Muslim closet could do an awful lot of good. Now that I read this, i'm a little bit dissapointed in him.

PS: I'm with SML on Craig Hodges. At the time of black-listing he had the best 3-point shot in the game.

 
At 9/07/2007 12:17 AM, Anonymous static kid said...

I don't have any links to substantiate it, but I seem to remember hearing somewhere that Shaq said that some of his family was Muslim (for some reason I want to say his dad or stepdad) but that some of it was Christian, and that he said he felt somewhere in between.

wv: uaijh (kind of looks like it could be transliterated Arabic)

 
At 9/07/2007 12:24 AM, Blogger Adam said...

Doesn't anybody remember back in 95-96, when Abdul-Rauf would refuse to stand for the national anthem. His refusal, if I remember correctly got a lot of press at the time. Even in those pre-9/11 days, folks were quick to recognize Islam when it was used in a sort of "anti-American" way, displayed by an average player. Shaq is not only a superstar, but he may very well have ushered in the modern age of the consummate American athlete/icon--a role that, obviously, some people might feel uncomfortable with being in the hands of a vocal Muslim.

 
At 9/07/2007 12:35 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This post/thread has major, MAJOR potential.

 
At 9/07/2007 1:01 AM, Blogger Pichi Campana Aguanta said...

My thoughts aren't very clear right now, but there seems to be some symmetry between Shaq's closet muslim-ness and Darko's unveiling of the True Serbian Gangsta.

 
At 9/07/2007 1:06 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

to Aaron: (concerning your comment on farmar etc) Absolutely nothing.

Shaq's refusal to openly come out and admit (admit? damn.) that he is a Muslim is so less an indictment on him and so much more to blame for what media/society has portrayed of what being a Muslim is(I'd also like to include --or call out-- moderate, peaceful Muslims who are afraid to speak out against what power-whore terrorist claim is their religion).

To conclude that "THE endorsement" is Shaq's main reason to keep his faith an uncertainty is too simple. Faith is complex and to allow the public to translate it incorrectly sullies that which is personal.

Shaq keeping his faith to himself and out of the limelight makes me respect him more than someone who is a complete hypocrite about his faith.

 
At 9/07/2007 1:35 AM, Blogger Mr. Six said...

I expect that the National Anthem Controversy was the worst thing for Abdul-Rauf's career.

And it was an interesting NBARS moment in its own right. As I recall, A-R said that he wouldn't stand for the anthem because it was inconsistent with his faith. (Wikipedia confirms and quotes him saying that the flag is a symbol of oppression, and that the US has a history of oppression.) The media went straight to Hakeem who said that was ridiculous. Since Hakeem was a "real Muslim" from Africa (and still one of the best players in the L at the time), the press concluded that A-R was just a fringe crackpot who didn't understand his own professed faith. It never occurred to those "reporters" that the viewpoint of an African muslim who immigrated to the US and became a citizen might be different from that of an African-American who converted to Islam and for whom his faith was lens for understanding his history and culture. But Stern stepped in, A-R was "counseled" by an imam who disagreed to him, the rednecks were placated, and the news cycle moved on, having once again failed to note the NBARS moment.

 
At 9/07/2007 1:46 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

TZ, just a nitpick - Haitians aren't considered Latinos; they're West Indians. (Haiti's official languages are French and Haitian Creole.)

 
At 9/07/2007 1:47 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Drunk and stoned, I stumbled across this photo and could only think of FD.

http://img515.imageshack.us/img515/1930/queenmjtn4.jpg

It's really quite a trip.

 
At 9/07/2007 1:53 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

You guys are buying into the official explanation as to why Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf refused to stand for the anthem (that he felt it was "inconsistent with his faith."). That actually wasn't it. There is nothing in Islam that forbids standing for anthems, which is why it's never been an issue for anyone else. The REAL reason Abdul-Rauf refused to stand was political - Rauf felt that the U.S. government was persecuting Muslims by keeping up the Iraqi embargo and not supporting a Palestinian state. He promised fellow members of his mosque (who apparently shared this view) that he'd never "honor America" until the U.S. changed its policies. However, it was a private protest and he did not want to make a huge deal out of it, so he lied and said his "beliefs" were the reason. (Of course, it ended up being a big deal anyway.) I have a really good source on this.

 
At 9/07/2007 2:01 AM, Blogger Mr. Six said...

Thanks for making my point Anon 1:53.

 
At 9/07/2007 2:34 AM, Blogger Justin said...

Aaron, that hypothetical second Jew is David Lee, who's also part Jewish.

Put them together, that's one fine Jewish player.

 
At 9/07/2007 2:35 AM, Blogger badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...

re: Shaq and Islam
I guess there are a couple of reasons for the level of dissonance. For one, he's neither militant nor quietly spiritual, the two Muslim archetypes in America.
Plus, the Shaq Mythology puts so emphasis on the Army Stepfather for who Shaq is (because biological didn't bother), something as polarizing as Islam just screws with the balance.

As Anon 1:16 suggests (I think), one need not be vocal about faith to be devout. I mean, Christianity is a HUGE part of who Dean Smith is, but you'd never know it if you're expecting him to lead a prayer circle at the end of a game or to lead the Promise Keepers or some shit. You see it in the way he takes someone like Rasheed under his wings.

At this point, I can't get over the fact that Shaq had multiple songs that got heavy rotation on BET - we're not talking some K.O.B.E. one-off. I also can't get over how much BET I watched growing up and how uncomfortable my mom was about it. And I can't get over how Kareem thought "No Hook" was a diss track.

I'm not sure where my thoughts are going with this, but I never thought Shaq would be this interesting to think about.

 
At 9/07/2007 4:49 AM, Blogger Bethlehem Shoals said...

a few points of order:

-shaq's stepfather is muslim, mom is baptist. yet presumably, he got the name before mr. harrison came into his life.

-melo has the PR flag tattooed on his hand. he likely okay'ed that nike ad, since he'd had a major say in the b. more campaign. and if i'm not mistaken, the footage in the PR commercial was taken when he went there to open some kids center he funded.

-arenas may not identify at all as cuban, but he sure does have an interesting accent.

-even if neither of them is totally dead-set on identifying as latino, presumably this still could be latched onto more often by the press, or by a socio-cultural group looking to identify a hero (a pretty time-honored practice in fandom).

-worth comparing the difference between puerto ricans in america and cuban-americans. puerto rico is part of america, and ricans in the states are integrated into (certain parts of) society. so it makes sense for them to want a hybrid hero like anthony.

on the other hand, cuban-americans are more isolated and constantly obsess over getting back to the motherland. and don't like to admit there are black cubans. so that might account for why arenas identifies less as cuban, and why it's less likely that fans, or the press, will get behind him as such.

i am tired as hell, but feel like the latter might also apply to shaq, if he is indeed NOI.

 
At 9/07/2007 7:52 AM, Anonymous MODI said...

Okay. Melo's tat seems to solve one puzzle on where he stands.

"Shaq's refusal to openly come out and admit (admit? damn.) that he is a Muslim is so less an indictment on him and so much more to blame for what media/society has portrayed of what being a Muslim is" ...To conclude that "THE endorsement" is Shaq's main reason to keep his faith an uncertainty is too simple."

Aaron, you may very well be correct on all counts here, however, Shaq is in a unique position to shatter the rigid Muslim stereotypes that you point out. It would be all for the greater good, even if not for his own life. From a societal-- and not personal-- perspective that I would have hoped Shaq would have considered that type of change he could have provided. At the end of the day Shaq should get great praise for who he is and his legendary generosity. There is no disdain coming from this direction, just a bit of dissapointment...

 
At 9/07/2007 9:10 AM, Anonymous paper tiger said...

a couple of thoughts...
one, on the melo/arenas identity questions, someone above (i think SML) pointed out that melo plays for the dream team, not PR. we obviously hear often about players having to choose, but i just think it's interesting that in so many other realms we're trying to move past either/or and embrace hybridity. some of us even like to say fuck borders. the olympic model of bringing the world together is now so dated as to be keeping us apart. (wow, that turned hokey.)
other thought, on shaq... my NOI knowledge is weak, and mostly comes from Ali (the movie, even), but i imagine the relative hush surrounding his status could come from the nation as much as from shaq. shaq's got his smiles and his rings and his whatever, but at base the guy is a big fucking goofball. perhaps the NOI hasn't been too keen on him being the public face.

 
At 9/07/2007 10:23 AM, Blogger Brown Recluse, Esq. said...

enough about shaq and melo, back to rex walters!!! i keep forgetting dude is JA. according to this article, he played in the japanese-american youth leagues in san jose:

"Rex Walters...grew up in San Jose and played for the Japanese American youth programs San Jose CYS as a child and then the San Jose Zebras in high school."

also, his mom is the japanese one.

 
At 9/07/2007 10:43 AM, Blogger goathair said...

Caron always seems a little Japanese to me. Probably because he looks so much like Pharrell, who wishes he was Japanese.

 
At 9/07/2007 11:01 AM, Anonymous laphonso said...

Shaq publicly identifying with the NOI would do nothing but compound the public perception of Muslims. I also have only a cursory understanding of the NOI (having just completed The Autobiography of Malcolm X) but I do know that blackness and the experience of black people in America is the lens through which the group views Islam, the Qu'ran, Allah, etc... This fact alone makes them controversial.
Middle America's fears of young black men in bow ties and militant young Arab men are very different. The very fact that the two are tied together in the public consciousness causes fear and misunderstanding.

 
At 9/07/2007 11:03 AM, Blogger stopmikelupica said...

Papertiger: Good point, NOI might not want its most well known member to be Shaq. But I still like the theory above that Shaq might be a 5%. Shaq seems to be very "Poor Righteous Teachers"!

Either way, he may just be like the Jewish players mentioned - he just does his thing, without being defined by it. I don't think the word "Allah" has ever come out of Shaq's mouth during a postgame interview, but I have heard him say "God" many times. I might be wrong on that, but that's my perception...

Point being he's probably just not a "hardcore" Muslim, just like David Lee is not Orthodox and taking Saturdays off, etc. I'm gonna go out on a limb here: He's probably not fasting for a whole month!

This is a great thread.

 
At 9/07/2007 11:04 AM, Blogger Brown Recluse, Esq. said...

caron butler looks korean not japanese!!

 
At 9/07/2007 11:22 AM, Blogger goathair said...

Word, Recluse. Dude has some Asian somewhere.

 
At 9/07/2007 11:46 AM, Anonymous paper tiger said...

sml- yeah, i'm inclined to buy the 5 percenter theory as well, to the extent i even understand what those words mean. i just think it's interesting how publicly claiming a faith gets a lot more two sided when there's a smaller, tightly organized group at the center. i mean, jerry falwell and james dobson were never likely to tell jon kitna to stop rocking jesus gear, but i could imagine, say, mark madsen, travis knight and shawn bradley receiving some coaching about being the public face of brigham's people. mark, travis, shawn, those guys are just as famous as shaq, right?

 
At 9/07/2007 2:17 PM, Anonymous MaxwellDemon said...

SML--forget Ramadan, Shaq probably isn't fasting between breakfast and brunch.

Anybody remember how Hakeem would play even better when he was fasting? All praise be to the Dream.

I think there's a thesis to be written on intra-Islamic racial semiotics in the NBA. To quote me, Darfur.

 
At 9/07/2007 6:23 PM, Blogger badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...

Completely off topic - speaking of David Lee, I proposed an idea to a friend a couple months ago: the Knicks could do a huge outreach to the Korean community by holding a David Lee night. Everyone named David Lee gets in free. Shit, just offer crazy cheap tickets to anyone named Lee.

Seriously, think about how many Dave Lees live in Fort, er, Lee, NJ. And with the Nets crossing rivers, the opportunity is ripe.

 
At 9/08/2007 2:26 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

How about the fact that Shaq could subscribe loosely to an assortment of religious/spiritual views and consider himself muslim just because of his background. Much like many "christians" believe in an assortment of world views that might not be supported by the christian establishment.

 
At 9/11/2007 12:03 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

badly drawn boykins (fka spinachdip) said...
" And I'm not sure which was worse for Chris Jackson's career, becoming Mahmoud Abdul Rauf or his Tourette's." Keith Glass has a chapter on Chris/Mahmoud in his book "Taking Shots". Interesting read and a lot more complicated than meets the eye. Mahmoud's Imam ended up being his agent, and that was the beginning of the end.

 
At 4/13/2009 4:19 AM, Blogger 平平 said...

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